Annals of Justice and Humanity

Annals of Justice and Humanity (AJH) is an international peer-reviewed and scholarly journal aimed at publicizing solutive and innovative ideas of researchers, practitioners, and academicians in addressing interesting legal issues and encouraging the development of legal studies. AJH welcomes submissions of high-quality and well-developed research manuscripts on wide range fields related to law science.

Current Issue

Annals of Justice and Humanity (AJH) is an international peer-reviewed and scholarly journal aimed at publicizing solutive and innovative ideas of researchers, practitioners, and academicians in addressing interesting legal issues and encouraging the development of legal studies. AJH welcomes submissions of high-quality and well-developed research manuscripts on wide range fields related to law science.

Published
2021-08-03

Articles

Shift in the role of criminology in criminal law: Reflecting the doctrinal change

Purpose: The study's aim is to assess how criminology's role in criminal law has changed over time. In addition, the author suggested that criminology can be used to test and suggest explanatory theories for criminal law rather than doctrinal shifts. Research methodology: The authors use literature-based observational analysis to assess how criminology's role in criminal law has evolved. Methodical investigation of logical literature uncovered the shift in the role of criminology in criminal law. Results: The authors claim that doctrinal changes have shifted perceptions of criminality, but the study's findings suggest otherwise. Doctrine changes mysteriously and without judicial acknowledgement, revealing shifting facts and suggests that the role of criminology in criminal law may be changing. Limitations: Even after a doctrinal shift, the authors argue, having criminological theories and perspectives helps assign proper rules to criminal law. Contribution: The study's findings support the often-criticized objectivist view of criminology but disagree on the subjectivist view of doctrine shifts. This study suggests that a new field will emerge that transcends both criminology and criminal laws rather than doctrine changes.

The law of treaties in Africa: Exploring the Southern African development community mutual defence pact

Purpose: The article explores the structural and fundamental discussions connected with the law of treaties with a detailed orientation towards the Southern African Development Community Mutual Defence Pact (SADC MDP) of 2003 and the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties of 1969. The study was informed by the principle of pacta sunt servanda. Research Methodology: The study employed a desktop research approach and a systematic review of a number of secondary sources on the law of treaties. Results: It was established that the SADC MDP drafters were cognizant of the principles of international law the treaties in framing this sub-regional legal instrument. Some articles within the SADC MDP are ignorant of the political realities of the international system. Limitations: The realism school of thought was used as the tool of analysis for this study in order to unravel the SADC MDP from a political perspective. Contributions: This study sought to educate jurists, policymakers, and implementers of laws and policies in the 21st century.